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Дресс-код: еврейский гардероб, одежда, которая помнит

Оригинал взят у evu67 в Дресс-код: еврейский гардероб, одежда, которая помнит»
Давно собиралась рассказать об выставке еврейского костюма в музее Израиля в Иерусалиме. Выставка будет открыта до октября 2014 года.
Dress Codes: Revealing the Jewish Wardrobe
Clothing That Remembers »
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Woman's outfit

Tafilalet region, Morocco, first half of the 20th century
Cotton and silk, silk-thread embroidery
Gift of Baroness Alix de Rothschild, Paris
Gift of Musée de l'Homme, Paris


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Women's Dress

Sweden (originally Germany), 1850s
Silk taffeta, , silk velvet, cotton lace
Lent by Judith Goldstein, née Hoffmann, Stockholm, Sweden

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Baby's coats


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Wedding outfit

Sandor, Iraqi Kurdistan, 1930s
Raw silk, silk-thread embroidery
Purchased through the gift of Joseph Boxenbaum, Herzliya


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Right: Henna dress

Iraq, Baghdad, 1891
Silk satin weave, silk and lace ribbons, tinsel embroidery
This dress belonged to Dakhla Rachel Mu`allem, Baghdad 1880–Teheran 1960, married at the age of 11.
Dakhla fled to Iran in 1948; when her children escaped Khomeini's regime for London, they took the dress with them.
Gift of Dakhla's daughter, Naomi Inbar, Ramat Gan.

Left: Wedding dress

Iraq, Baghdad, 1880s
Brocaded silk, silk ribbons, tinsel embroidery, hand sewn
Gift of Mazli F. Iny, New York, in memory of her mother Mas`uda Mathalon

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Modesty in the Eye of the Beholder
Although emphasizing the breast, these dresses were nonetheless considered a symbol of female modesty. In 1906, Rabbi Yosef Hayyim, one of the leaders of the Baghdad Jewish community, even criticized women who abandoned this modest style in favor of open-coat dresses.

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Clothes of Rabbi Hayyim Moshe Bejerano Efendi

Turkey, early 20th century
Broadcloth, gilt-metal-thread couched embroidery
Gift of Diamant Baratz Béjarano and Arnaldo Béjarano, Courbevoie, France


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"The Great Dress" (berberisca or al kesswa l'kebira )"

Fez, Morocco, early 20th century
Silk velvet, gilt metal cords and braided ribbons
Gift of Perla Ben-Soussan, France Gift of Armand Amselem, France

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Woman’s coat

Bukhara, Uzbekistan, late 19th century
Brocaded silk; lining: silk and cotton, ikat-dyed

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Explosion of Color
An The dizzying colors of ikat displayed here highlight the clothing's inner lining and give importance to often unseen parts of the garment. Due to its strong smell, the use of ikat was initially considered repugnant, and was exclusively a Jewish practice; however as the process was perfected it came to be a highly esteemed specialty.


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Jewish woman's wrap (izar) and face veil (khiliyye)

Baghdad, Iraq, late 19th – early 20th century
Silk, gilt metal thread; veil: horsehair
Gift of Helene Simon and Hanina Shasha, New York, in memory of their mother, Louise Zilka née Bashi
Gift of Mazli Nawi, Ramat Gan

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The most famous of the Baghdad workshops belonged to master weaver Menashe Yitzhak Sa'at, nicknamed Abu-al-Izan ("father of the izar") due to the fabric wraps in which he specialised. One year after Sa'at immigrated to Israel, the izar industry in Baghdad came to an end.


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Jewish woman's wrap (chader) and face veil (ruband)

Herat, Afghanistan, mid-20th century
Cotton, netted silk-thread embroidery
Purchased through the gift of Dr. Willy and Charlotte Reber, Valbella, Switzerland

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Mourning scarves

Uzbekistan, early 20th century
Silk, reserved dye printing


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Woman's attire

Mashhad, Iran, early 20th century
Silk, silk velvet, cotton satin, gilt-metal-cord embroidery
Purchased through the gift of Bruce Kovner, New York

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From Paris to Persia
When Quajar Shah Nasir al-Din and his wife embarked on a journey to Europe in 1873, they were inspired by the "ballerina" skirts they saw in Paris. Upon returning to Iran, they brought with them a new style of dress, characterized by heavily-pleated short skirts and tight pants


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Bridal outfit

Tunis, Tunisia, early 20th century
Satin silk, gilt-metal-cord embroidery, cotton-thread embroidery on tulle

Tunis, Tunisia, early 20th century
Satin silk, gilt-metal-cord embroidery, cotton-thread embroidery on tulle

Bridal outfit

Tunis, Tunisia, early 20th century
Satin silk, gilt-metal-cord embroidery, cotton-thread embroidery on tulle

Bridal outfit

Tunis, Tunisia, early 20th century
Satin silk, gilt-metal-cord embroidery, cotton-thread embroidery on tulle

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Women's Festive Attire

Tripoli, Libya, early – mid-20th century
Wrap: Artificial silk; Blouse: Chiffon silk; Belt: Gilt silver
Gift of Louise Djerbi, Jerusalem in memory of Luly Raccah
Gift of Lionelle Arbib in memory of his grandmother Ida Arbib née Nahum Lent by the Habib family, Milan


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Bridal Jacket

Isfahan, Iran, early 20th century
Silk velvet, silver tinsel embroidery


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Married Woman's Outfit

Salonika, Greece early 20th century
Silk, brocaded and ribbed, cotton lace
Gift of Esther Jeanne Haelion Ben-Susan, Paris in memory of the mother Gracia,
Gift of Flora and Shlomo Perahia, Claire and Robert Saltiel, Paris, in memory of their mother Rivka Perahia née Cohen
Gift of Vicki Sciaky, Tel Aviv, in memory of her husband Haim Joseph and her son Joseph Haim Sciaky,

Gift of the Saloniki Jewry Research Center Tel Aviv


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http://www.imj.org.il/exhibitions/2014/dresscodes/en/home/
Tags: XIXв., Восток, костюм, перепост, текстиль
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